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Current Legislation in Vermont

Click on a bill number below to get information on the bill

Vermont General Assembly: https://legislature.vermont.gov/

HB 137 - An act relating to exemptions from the minimum wage

This measure relates to exemptions from the minimum wage.
More specifically, this measure proposes to provide a minimum salary that an individual must earn to qualify as an executive, administrative, or professional employee for purposes of being exempt from the minimum wage law.

HB 351 - An act relating to workers’ compensation, unemployment insurance, and ski tramway amendments

This measure would increase the minimum wage to $12.50.
Beginning on January 1,  2020, an employer may not employ any employee at a rate of less than $11.50. Beginning on January 1, 2021, an employer may not employ any employee at a rate of less than $12.50,

HB 429 - An act relating to increasing the minimum wage and phasing out the tipped minimum wage

This measure proposes to increase the minimum wage to $15.00 per hour by January 1, 2024. It also proposes yearly increases to the tipped minimum wage until an eventual phase-out by January 1, 2029.

Mores specifically, this measure states that beginning on January 1, 2020, an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $11.50. This wage will rise each January by 6.76%, until reaching $15 in January of 2024.

Beginning on January 1, 2020, an employer shall not employ a service or tipped employee at a basic wage rate of less than $6.20. The wage increases by 90 cents, one dollar, and $1.10 each subsequent January.

Beginning on January 1, 2024 an employer shall not employ a service or tipped employee at a basic wage rate of less than $10.35, with increases of $1.15 each year afterwards until January 1, 2029. At this point all employees shall be paid the minimum wage. If the Federal wage for tipped employees were to exceed the tipped wage of the state, the Federal wage shall apply.

HB 434 - An act relating to including the amount expended by an employer for health insurance in the determination of the minimum wage

This measure changes the minimum wage calculation to account for employer healthcare costs.

More specifically, this measure proposes to amend the minimum wage to include a calculation for the amount expended by each employer to provide an employee with health insurance. The minimum wage for each employee shall be reduced by a prorated amount based on the employer’s annual cost to provide him or her with health insurance coverage up to a maximum reduction equal to the full annual cost of the premium for the lowest cost silver-level plan available through the Vermont Health Benefit Exchange.

HB 510 - An act relating to increasing the minimum wage

This measure proposes to increase the  minimum wage to $15.00 per hour by January 1, 2024.

More specifically, this measure states that an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $10.78.

  • Beginning on January 1,  2020, an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $11.50.
  • Beginning on January 1, 2021, an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $12.25.
  • Beginning on January 1, 2022, an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $13.10.
  • Beginning on January 1, 2023, an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $14.05.
  • Beginning on January 1, 2024, an employer shall not employ any employee at a rate of less than $15.00, and on each subsequent January 1 the minimum wage rate shall be increased by five percent or the  percentage increase of the Consumer Price Index, CPI-U, U.S. city average, not seasonally adjusted, or successor index, as calculated by the U.S. Department of Labor or successor agency for the 12 months preceding the previous September 1, whichever is smaller, but in no event shall the minimum  wage be decreased.

This measure states that a tip shall be the sole property of the employee or employees to  whom it was paid, given, or left. An employer that permits patrons to pay tips by credit card shall pay an employee the full amount of the tip that the customer indicated, without any deductions for credit card processing fees or costs that may be charged to the employer by the credit card company. This measure states that an employer shall not collect, deduct, or receive any portion of a tip  left for an employee or credit any portion of a tip left for an employee against the wages due to the employee pursuant to subsection (a) of this section.  This subsection shall not be construed to prohibit the pooling of tips among service or tipped employees as defined pursuant to subsection (a) of this section.

HB 577 - An act relating to the basic needs budget and livable wage

This measure amends the definition of a livable wage.
This bill proposes to amend the definition of livable wage for purposes of the basic needs budget that is calculated at the beginning of each legislative biennium so that the livable wage is based on a family with two adult wage earners, two children, and no employer-sponsored health insurance.

HB 646 - An act relating to modernizing Vermont’s wage and hour laws

This measure creates the Tipped and Student Minimum Wage Study Committee.

This measure creates a committee to examine the effects of altering or eliminating the basic wage rate for tipped employees in Vermont and eliminating the subminimum wage for secondary school students during the school year.

The Committee is to study the effects of altering or eliminating the basic wage rate for tipped employees and of eliminating the subminimum wage for secondary school students during the school year, including the following issues:

  1. the impact in states that have eliminated their tipped wage on jobs, prices, and the state economy and the welfare of tipped workers, women, and working families with children;
  2. the impact in states that have increased their tipped wage during the last 10 years on jobs, prices, and the state economy and the welfare of tipped workers, women, and working families with children;
  3. the impact in states that have decoupled their tipped wage from the standard minimum wage during the last 10 years on jobs, prices, and the state economy and the welfare of tipped workers, women, and working families with children;
  4. the projected impact in Vermont of altering or eliminating the basic wage rate for tipped employees on jobs, prices, and the State economy and the welfare of tipped workers, women, and working families with children.

SB 166 - An act relating to reforming the State Board of Education

This measure shifts duties and responsibilities between the State Board of Education, the Secretary of Education, and the Agency of Education. None of these are new requirements, only changing who oversees the implementation.

The State Board is charged with adopting rules regarding independent school program approval, including approval of distance learning schools, post-secondary schools, and private kindergarten approval. Under the revised title, "independent school" means a school other than a public school.

The Secretary must now submit reports and is responsible for disaggregating by incident type the data on hazing, harassment, or bullying incidents. The Harassment, Hazing, and Bullying Advisory Council must now report to the Secretary annually.

The Secretary must now ensure students enrolled in secondary career technical education have access to a substantially equal educational opportunity by developing a system to evaluate the equalizing effects of Vermont’s education finance system and education quality standards. The Secretary now has the overall responsibility for the effectiveness of career technical education. The Secretary must now prescribe the rules by which the effectiveness of each career technical center in Vermont is evaluated.

The Secretary must now appoint a person to supervise the preparation and development of comprehensive health education programs, as well as establish an Advisory Council on Wellness and Comprehensive Health.

The Secretary must now establish a minimum set of hours of operation and approve waivers for unanticipated closings.

The Secretary must now receive reports on district data regarding students transported or boarded by the school districts.

The Agency must now develop a plan for establishing a comprehensive system of services for early education in the first three grades to ensure that all students learn to read by the end of the third grade.

SB 299 - An act relating to exemptions from minimum wage and overtime requirements

This measure provides a minimum salary that an individual must earn to qualify as an executive, administrative, or professional employee in order to be exempt from the provisions of the minimum wage law.
This measure provides that the minimum salary that an individual must earn to qualify as an executive, administrative, or professional employee in order to be exempt from the provisions of the minimum wage law is at least $913 per week.